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Ann, now that you're done with the series, may I put the links to the articles on my LJ? I think some of the f-list would be intrested in reading them.


By all means, link away!

I love this series you've done. It sparked a rant from me in my blog recently, which has a bit of an argument going on in the comments. (Well, I'm doing most of the arguing. You're much more polite than I, whereas I'm of the "pepper with swear words and italics" school of expression.)

I saw that! And that comment would have made me swear, too. It's why I don't read comments in some places.

One admired woman author the commenter doesn't like is proof women are inferior writers? Really? You don't maybe want to rethink that? No?

Here, let me show you my clue stick.

This reminds me of Stravinsky!

I can't help but be reminded of the (possibly apocryphal) riots at the Paris premiere of Stravinsky's Rite of Spring. Presumably the music was so different from what audiences are used to that the audience lost their minds. Talk about cultural blinders, right? And then, - the story goes - the next time it was played, people had become accustomed to the dissonance and thought it was awesome. Widening the definition of music, even the definition of good music by repeated exposure.

Where's my SF Rite of Spring? I want riots! I want people to lose their mind reading and then gain it again!

Re: This reminds me of Stravinsky!

According to the (generally well-researched) playbills at the NY Philharmonic, this is a true story.

Similarly, Bizet's Carmen was initially received with confusion and "meh" reactions; and he died shortly thereafter, never knowing that it would revolutionize opera forever. It was the opinions of his professional-composer contemporaries, who knew music, that ultimately brought it it's reputation.

Great post! Let's hope there's a chance for me, from overseas, to pluck your or some other editor's strings one day....

you're biased against fairies. :p

What a great series, Ann. I was sad to miss the panel, and it's so great to have such a thorough, nuanced, and neatly-strung-together series of posts about the subject to read.

This is very thought-provoking. Thank you.

Hi Ann, it's Beth. June 2011 seemed like a good time to reset my LJ password and post a comment on your blog!

Lots of Wiscon-inspired thinkin', I see, and good food for thought for your readers.

I meander on the peripheries of a number of fandoms from games to anime, and, I hope you're sitting down, the "male" base assumption, whether protagonist or consumer or employee, is in all those places, too.

Women work. They have their own money. It's peculiar, to put it mildly, that producers of media seem not to recognize that, or think it's important. It's easy enough to find things that are friendly to me, in whatever sense or in whatever medium, but it'd sure be nice if 50% of what was out there attempted to address me at all, rather than 10% (or 2% in the case of games).

Beth! It's you!!!!! :) What's up, how're things??


Women work. They have their own money. It's peculiar, to put it mildly, that producers of media seem not to recognize that, or think it's important. It's easy enough to find things that are friendly to me, in whatever sense or in whatever medium, but it'd sure be nice if 50% of what was out there attempted to address me at all, rather than 10% (or 2% in the case of games).</a>

Oh, Mithras, yes. On all counts. And it's really amazing, people saying "but women don't like this" when if that's true, "what can we do to make this equally appealing to women" (I mean in a real way, not "I know, let's make it about clothes and spray-paint it pink!" way) might easily get them, like, way more money.

I'm not much of a gamer, but you'd think the industry would take a cue from the success of things like The Sims.

aaaand I screwed up the formatting. Should have hit preview, sorry.

You might like Let's Talk about Love by Carl Wilson, in which an indie rock critic realizes that he's been trained to hate Celine Dion's music, and gets over it.

Oooh, I haven't read that, thanks!

That's a whole other piece of that puzzle, isn't it, the way music (among other arts) also gets marked for class or gender or whatever and people's likes and dislikes will so often fall right along those lines. And the weird anxiety some groups have around some artists--Celine Dion, Justin Bieber, whoever--so often looks like either contempt for the folks that artist "belongs" to or fear of losing the proper status if one becomes identified with those folks in any way.

Or that's the way it looks to me.

thank you for this series; i really enjoyed it.

Aswiebe's Market List Update 2011-07

User cloudscudding referenced to your post from Aswiebe's Market List Update 2011-07 saying: [...] On editors’/readers’ biases and context: http://ann-leckie.livejournal.com/167498.html [...]

I have to be careful about choosing classical and jazz music. Some of it is just too complicated for my ears to follow properly. I think jazz might actually be fading out just because it can be so much more complicated than rock, and too many people just want a strong danceable beat or something easy to sing along with.

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